Early Childhood Council: The Tomatis® Method – A Sound Approach to Enhancing Learning Within Early Education

swings-roundabouts-summer-2016

The Tomatis® Method was featured in the December 2016 issue of Swings & Roundabouts published by Early Childhood Council.

Get inspired by how the Tomatis® Method has been included in the daily activities at the Kerikeri Community Childcare Trust and enjoy the learning story about Karl who after only 40 hours of Tomatis® listening has become calmer, more settled and receptive: finally able to listen and learn.

The Early Childhood Council  represents more than 1,100 independent early childhood centres employing thousands of teachers, and caring for tens of thousands of children. The magazine Swings & Roundabouts is published four times a year and is distributed to all the centres.

Read the article here. Scroll forward to page 26 to find it.

Boy With Dyslexia

Letter from Harriet whose son has finished a Tomatis programme in Auckland. She writes:

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My name is Harriet Epstein. I have a dyslexic son with audio processing complications. I came across the Tomatis Method a few months ago and was delighted to meet Maria whose work has been invaluable to his progress and development.

I took my son out of school last year and home schooled him for a couple of terms, as the education system was not meeting his needs. I feel very strongly that the Tomatis Method offered by Maria and Fredrik has been an integral part of his progress. (Published with permission.)

Study shows Tomatis® Method reduces stress in university students

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A study published in the Journal of Psychology in Africa, Volume 26, Issue 1, 2016 has found that the Tomatis® Method is effective in reducing stress and increasing well-being among university students.

Tomatis® Method comparative efficacy in promoting self-regulation in tertiary students: A systematic review

Abstract
This systematic review sought to determine the evidence on how the Tomatis® Method, a sound stimulation intervention for improving listening, compares to other self-regulation interventions with tertiary students. We searched studies from the following data bases ‘Academic FileOne, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Communication & Mass Media Complete, eBook (EBSCOHost), HeinOnline, OAPEN Library, PsychARTICLES, PsychINFO, SocINDEX, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar; and the North-West University repository’ and for the period spanning 2003 to 2013. Studies included for the analysis met these criteria: Published between 2003 and 2013; published and written in English, student participant samples from tertiary institutions such as a universities or colleges; programmes or interventions developed and implemented with a positive effect on well-being or self-regulation; application of the Tomatis® Method in a student population, irrespective of an experimental design. A total of 35 articles met the inclusion criteria. The evidence was thematically analysed using narrative analysis. Findings suggest the Tomatis® Method to be superior to alternative self-regulation approaches in decreasing psychosocial and emotional stressors, as well as enhancing well-being of students. The Tomatis® Method was as effective as alternative approaches in promoting self-awareness and self-monitoring. Alternative methods were more effective than the Tomatis® Method in aspects of critical thinking. The Tomatis® Method appears to compare well with other interventions for the promotion of self-regulation among tertiary students.

Click for more information.

Photo via Visual hunt.

Tomatis® Now in Taranaki

The Tomatis® Method has reached Taranaki and is helping children and adults develop and enhance their cognitive functions as well as reducing stress and anxiety. Watch this great video and read the article published in Taranaki Daily News.

Kylie Ujdur, Tomatis® Practioner Level 1 explains the Tomatis® Method and the benefits of a training programme.

Read the full article here.

Melanie Vezey: A Testimonial on Dyslexia, Learning and Voice

Listen to Melanie, a mother of two sons with Dyslexia, on her testimony on the Tomatis® Programme.

 

I’m extremely pleased we found the Tomatis method for our boys but I’m actually pleased that we found it for me as
well.

 

One of our sons had reading difficulties in school. He just wasn’t able to learn the traditional way that he was being taught even though we had him tested, and he had exceptional hearing and exceptional eyesight. So over the years he was falling behind in his reading and writing and everything at school. Even though the school was trying each year a different method of intervention, a different reading programme, or support and we even tried different programmes on our own but the result was that it left him confused, frustrated and eventually we noticed that his confidence was starting to erode and no parent wants to see that.

I found Maria from an internet search just after a friend had loaned me the book, When Listening Comes Alive and I just glanced through it quickly and the few points I read I knew that this was something that I had to research.

So I found Maria online, she answered the phone and it turns out that they were just unpacking their boxes from having moved to New Zealand. So I was as pleased to find her when she just stepped into the country as she was to have her first client phone her.

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Sounds in the Foreign Language Lesson

This paper by Philipp Botes, published in Scenario Volume 2015, Issue 1, describes the link between language and music, and between voice and hearing based on Dr Tomatis research and the “Tomatis Effect”. There is also an example of how sounds and music can be used in foreign language teaching and learning.

Click here to read full article.

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Listening Therapy with the Tomatis® Effect

 

The Tomatis® Method is a pedagogical method used to improve the listening of a person whose hearing functions correctly. It works thanks to a device, the Tomatis® Electronic Ear, that causes musical contrasts by suddenly and unpredictably changing the timbre and intensity of the music. This effect surprises the brain and triggers its attention mechanisms. We say that the brain puts itself in a listening position.

Sound is transmitted through air via the ear canal. It is also transmitted by a vibration at the top of the headset. This vibration is called bone conduction. Bone conduction transmits the sound directly to the inner ear, thus preparing it to receive the sound transmitted through the eardrum. Read More

Listening Affects Learning

Come to this talk if there is room for improvement for your child or yourself. Auditory processing is key to effective brain function. Registration and more info at: www.tomatis.co.nz/kerikeri

21 Apr 2016 TOMATIS TALK KERIKERI

 

Early Effects of the Tomatis Listening Method in Children with Attention Deficit Disorder

Via OhioLINK ETD: Sacarin, Liliana.

Author
Sacarin, Liliana

Year and Degree
2013, Psy. D., Antioch University, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology.

Abstract
This study investigated the early effects of the Tomatis Method, hypothesizing improvement in processing speed, phonological awareness, reading efficiency, attention, behavior and brain physiology by the end of Phase 1 of the Tomatis Method. This study documented the effects of the first phase of the Tomatis Method on children with ADD ages 7-13.

Of the 25 participants, 15 received solely the Tomatis treatment while 10 served as controls and were stabilized on ADD medication three months prior to and throughout the study. Therefore, this research study compared Tomatis versus non-Tomatis intervention, not ADD medication treatment with Tomatis intervention.

The Tomatis group received 15 consecutive 2 hour sessions; participants received no additional vestibular or visual-motor exercises throughout the research.

Results revealed statistically significant improvements for the Tomatis group when compared to the non-Tomatis group: the experimental group showed significant improvement in processing speed, phonological awareness, phonemic decoding efficiency when reading, behavior, and auditory attention. Read More

The use of music as therapeutic intervention for students with APD

Title:
The use of music and other forms of organized sound as a therapeutic intervention for students with auditory processing disorder: providing the best auditory experience for children with learning differences

by Faronii-Butler, Kishasha O., Ed.D., FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY, 2013, 154 pages; 3603783

Abstract:
This auto-ethnographical inquiry used vignettes and interviews to examine the therapeutic use of music and other forms of organized sound in the learning environment of individuals with Central Auditory Processing Disorders.

It is an investigation of the traditions of healing with sound vibrations, from its earliest cultural roots in shamanism and ritual healing ceremony through its present evolutionary form of what is currently referred to as music and auditory integration therapy. The matter-altering power of sound-wave vibrations are invited to support traditional teaching methodologies in the learning environment of children with ADHD, ASD, and other learning differences as well as neuro-typical children who have difficulty attending due to issues caused by a disruptive, distorted, or inappropriate processing of sounds.

This qualitative research proposes that sound vibrations and music-based listening can be directed with given intention. Timbre, pitch, and volume can target specific areas of the body to bring about changes in problematic behavior, language acquisition, as well as improved productivity, learning, and development. Read More