Early Childhood Council: The Tomatis® Method – A Sound Approach to Enhancing Learning Within Early Education

swings-roundabouts-summer-2016

The Tomatis® Method was featured in the December 2016 issue of Swings & Roundabouts published by Early Childhood Council.

Get inspired by how the Tomatis® Method has been included in the daily activities at the Kerikeri Community Childcare Trust and enjoy the learning story about Karl who after only 40 hours of Tomatis® listening has become calmer, more settled and receptive: finally able to listen and learn.

The Early Childhood Council  represents more than 1,100 independent early childhood centres employing thousands of teachers, and caring for tens of thousands of children. The magazine Swings & Roundabouts is published four times a year and is distributed to all the centres.

Read the article here. Scroll forward to page 26 to find it.

Early Effects of the Tomatis Listening Method in Children with Attention Deficit Disorder

Via OhioLINK ETD: Sacarin, Liliana.

Author
Sacarin, Liliana

Year and Degree
2013, Psy. D., Antioch University, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology.

Abstract
This study investigated the early effects of the Tomatis Method, hypothesizing improvement in processing speed, phonological awareness, reading efficiency, attention, behavior and brain physiology by the end of Phase 1 of the Tomatis Method. This study documented the effects of the first phase of the Tomatis Method on children with ADD ages 7-13.

Of the 25 participants, 15 received solely the Tomatis treatment while 10 served as controls and were stabilized on ADD medication three months prior to and throughout the study. Therefore, this research study compared Tomatis versus non-Tomatis intervention, not ADD medication treatment with Tomatis intervention.

The Tomatis group received 15 consecutive 2 hour sessions; participants received no additional vestibular or visual-motor exercises throughout the research.

Results revealed statistically significant improvements for the Tomatis group when compared to the non-Tomatis group: the experimental group showed significant improvement in processing speed, phonological awareness, phonemic decoding efficiency when reading, behavior, and auditory attention. Read More